Tag Archives: morals

Why Do People Cheat: Part 3, Tiger Woods’ Story

CHEATING is an age old tradition. It is a common side effect of marriage itself. However, in the olden days, we lived in a world where many matches were dictated by factors other than the free will of the spouses-to-be.

We now spend half of our life looking for that perfect someone, find them, win them over into marrying us and then… Then, look for someone else to F**K….??!!??

Well, we are very demanding these days, expecting the world to cater to all to our desires. In our technologically advanced, sex-crazed and cynical time of little self-restraint, CHEATING has reincarnated itself in a new glory, in numbers unseen.

I think the cheaters of the olden days would die from envy looking at the glorious Cheaters Heaven we have cultivated these days. All you have to do is get on a dating site in the privacy of your password-protected IPhone screen … and voilĂ . (No one but our government, of course, will ever have to know.)

Is cheating good, bad or NECESSARY?

So here we have it: the institution of marriage is as fragile as ever, and cheaters are thriving in numbers unseen. Is it good for the modern marriage? Or bad? Does the behind-the-scenes freedom make the trials of marriage easier to endure, or does it destroy it? I am even afraid to ask what is it doing to our morals and our society standards.

“Wait a second,” you say. “In contrast to our private behavior standards, everything is intact when it comes to our public standards! We are as vigilant as ever!” Lets look at an example of how raging passions and our high moral stance clash when the veil of cheating does come down:

Why did we tear into poor Tiger Woods’ throat with such vengeance: nearly cut his jugular, destroyed his image and his family, and painted the walls of the news casting booth with his blood? Is the amount of sex he wants, gets and needs not his own business? Should his wife not have been the one to decide if she could forgive him, or grant him an open marriage big enough for his persona (another sign of our times) or still decide to leave him, but on her own terms?

Of course, you will say, “His wife was the victim, she did not know what a monster he was.” But was it not the media that made her the victim, when they were publicly torturing them both by relishing the juicy details of his gallivanting, painstakingly turning them over and over, savoring every dirty piece of his laundry for all to smell?

I would not hesitate to compare the pain the media was trying to inflict with the pain of having Mr. and Mrs. Woods sit with their tender behinds on sharp thorny stakes, so they would both slowly slide down, piercing all their internal organs, in the public execution-style of barbarian times.

It appeared so scandalous and so shocking to society when each new revelation was brought to light. They exclaimed, “How could he have been so dirty, so gluttonous, so licentious, so utterly despicable?”

But lets look at this from his perspective: his sexual needs, desires and capacity, as shocking as they may appear to us, are clearly illustrated by his own endeavors. He feels them, he has them, potent as they are, and he wants to gratify them with all the blood in his veins. On top of it he is constantly offered all the sex he wants by countless adoring women everywhere, while he is on the road so far from home and his wife.

After all, who could resist such a temptation? Well clearly he could not! He knew the risks, but he got caught up! May be he just figured he was entitled to it, it was his for the taking for being a sports hero – he was living his life and glory to the fullest! Like in the olden day, the true conquistadores would got all the gold and all the women (they must have had the wives somewhere back home as well).

“Well,” we say, “yes he may have his sex needs, desires, and infinite opportunities, but he had a reputation to uphold, by which he is supposed to be an example to us all and to contain the beast in him with all his moral might. And he has made bad choices and he needs to be crucified, to make an example to all the other husbands!”

But hold on a second guys, did we not just conclude that these “other husbands” are also CHEATERS, almost in their entirety? Are the other men supposed to cheer him, or pity that the poor bastard got caught as they marvel at what a run he had? Is this discouraging them or only urging them on? Are you not seeing the irony of this?